Sunday, July 30, 2017

Stormy Weather at Fukushima Daiichi

Futaba Cam view:

 



Unit 1 View
 

Fukushima looks eerie in these screenshots: https://www.dropbox.com/s/qwclrzegcinop1d/July%2029%20-%2031%202017%20Fog%20Stormy%20Weather.pdf?dl=1

Perhaps the fog that billowed near the plant for a brief period is a result of ordinary interactions between heat and precipitation, but the visual spectacle is jolting in its suggestiveness...

Would Fukushima's ongoing tritium releases change the properties of the fog and steam surrounding the plant through tritiation? Tritiation is a known process, as described here by Wikipedia:
Tritiated water is a radioactive form of water where the usual hydrogen atoms are replaced with tritium. In its pure form it may be called tritium oxide or super-heavy water. Pure T₂O is corrosive due to self-radiolysis. Wikipedia 
I've collected a number of sources on the subject and will be investigating this further when I get time....

From past research I've found considerable scientific disagreement about the atmospheric effects of human engineered nuclear explosions and radioactivity. I strongly recommend reading Jacob Darwin Hamblin's excellent book exploring these debates and proposed technologies, Arming Mother Nature



4 comments:

  1. “Thus it is concluded that the presence of these radio-nuclides in atmospheric aerosols can increase their seeding capability and more fog can form in the atmosphere. Therefore the presence of radioactive aerosols is also one of the so many factors responsible for fog formation.” 6 Issue 14 Gohar Ali, E.U. Khan, N. Ali, H. A. Khan, A. Waheed http://www.pmd.gov.pk/rnd/rnd_files/vol7_issue14/1_The%20Effect%20of%20Radioactive%20Aerosols%20on%20Fog%20Formation_GoharAli.pdf

    There was another study I saw, I think it was a Japanese study saying tritium produced larger hail. Can't locate the link. Look forward to your research.

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    1. The tritium nucleus, containing one proton and two neutrons,[7] has the same charge as the nucleus of ordinary hydrogen, and it experiences the same electrostatic repulsive force when brought close to another atomic nucleus. However, the neutrons in the tritium nucleus increase the attractive strong nuclear force when brought close enough to another atomic nucleus. As a result, tritium can more easily fuse with other light atoms, compared with the ability of ordinary hydrogen to do so. - Wikipedia

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    2. Thank you Horse and Bobby! I very much appreciate your contributions here!

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  2. Thank you, Majai, for that RT video we would never see otherwise in the US.
    I noticed after every fog we have here on the Calif central coast I feel a tremendous heat at night and during the day we are cooking at triple digits. In 2014 three days after a July 31st explosion at Fukushima my entire frontal neck thryoid area swelled up and couldn't move my neck without alot of pain. Doctors had no clue as to what caused caused it.

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