Monday, November 12, 2018

Cell Phone Radiation Linked to Rat Cancer - Herbicide Linked to Damaging Crop - Nuclear Energy Linked to Catastrophe: But Let's Keep Using Them!


Catastrophic risks: Discerned but ignored:
Krouse, Sarah (2018, Nov 1). Scientists Find ‘Clear Evidence’ Cellphone Radiation Can Cause Cancer in Rats. Wall Street Journal, https://www.wsj.com/articles/scientists-find-clear-evidence-cellphones-can-cause-cancer-in-rats-1541083400  
Researchers cite growing confidence in links between radiation exposure and some tumors in rats. U.S. researchers found “clear evidence” that cellphone radiation exposure can cause cancerous heart tumors in male rats. It is still unclear what the final conclusions of their two-decades-long study of the health impact on rodents mean for humans.... 
The study focused on radio frequency radiation akin to what’s used in 2G and 3G cellphones and exposed animals to cellphone radiation at levels higher than what human cellphone users typically experience

Bunge, Jacob (2018, November 1). EPA Allows Use of Bayer Herbicide. The Wall Street Journal, A6. Online available here https://www.wsj.com/articles/epa-allows-farmers-to-keep-using-bayers-controversial-weedkiller-1541040054?mod=searchresults&page=1&pos=3

The Environmental Protection Agency will continue to allow farmers to spray crops with a controversial weedkiller, while tightening restrictions, the agency said.

The EPA extended by two years its approval of XtendiMax, a version of the herbicide dicamba made by Bayer BAYRY -3.54% AG, which some farmers and researchers have blamed for damaging millions of acres of crops over the past two years.

EDITORIAL: Aging Tokai No. 2 reactor should be scrapped, not restarted November 8, 2018) The Asahi Shimbun,  http://www.asahi.com/ajw/articles/AJ201811080024.html

The nation's nuclear watchdog on Nov. 7 formally approved a 20-year operating extension of the Tokai No. 2 nuclear power plant in Ibaraki Prefecture, which is approaching the end of its 40-year legal life span.

The decision by the Nuclear Regulation Authority effectively marks the end of government-mandated technical screening to allow Japan Atomic Power Co. to bring the offline plant back on stream.
But all sorts of questions and concerns remain.

WHY is learning so hard?

Human beings are the slowest learners on the planet.

Only this species is capable of wiping out complex life on earth and seems, against all expressed intentions, cathected to that objective.


Fukushima Daiichi this morning: