Tuesday, July 25, 2017

Little Sunfish Finds Shards of Reactor Fuel at Fukushima Unit 3


First, please see my previous post on Fukushima Daiichi's Unit 3's reactor fuel:
How Much Fuel Was in Fukushima Unit 3's Reactor?

Where is the fuel from Fukushima Unit 3 Reactor 
Second, please take a look at a video of Unit 3 published by the Asahi Shimbun showing some fuel found by the Little Sunfish robot http://www.asahi.com/ajw/articles/AJ201707250039.html

The robot is approximately the size of a loaf of bread. It has found some damaged fuel in reactor 3's outer containment, which is flooded with continuous injections to keep fuel cool.

At 4 seconds into the video we can see some damaged fuel and what looks like disturbance in the water. Can anyone decipher what is causing the disturbance?

Is it merely a reflection or is the broken fuel causing the disturbance?

Thanks for your thoughts!

3 comments:

  1. Regarding your previous post, I agree that the "fog" around the reactors looks clumpy. It's probably where the reactors are emitting the most heat/radiation.
    I'm not sure what we're looking at in the video attachment above. Why is there so much water flow everywhere? Is this from water that TEPCO is pumping in or from the natural uunderground rivers flowing through and out to sea? Couldn't the water flow itself cause disruptions?

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    1. I understand TEPCO as saying that unit 3's reactor fuel is in the outer containment, which is flooded deliberately with injections aimed at cooling fuel AND flooded also by the river running under the site.

      The fuel is damaged so it must be cooled but lack of containment of damaged fuel is leading to ground water contamination, ocean contamination and TRITIUM atmospheric contamination (among whatever other isotopes are still being aerosolized)

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  2. It's the waving surface of water mirroring the light of the robot. The camera looking up through the damaged control rod apparatus.
    The yellow-brown sediment looks like mixed uranium oxides (most of them yellow and orange) and rust.

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