Wednesday, June 24, 2015

North American Pacific Coast Eco Collapse and Missing Fukushima Fuel




Enenews is reporting that major media continue to ponder the location of Fukushima Daiichi’s missing fuel:

http://enenews.com/ap-biggest-question-fukushimas-melted-fuel-asahi-fuel-mainichi-one-fuel-experts-nuclear-cores-hit-groundwater-could-melted-ground-world-never-case-like-fukushima-fuel-melted-fell-video

Yamaguchi, Mari (2015, June 17). What's Ahead for Japan's Fukushima Nuclear Plant.http://abcnews.go.com/Technology/wireStory/ahead-japans-fukushima-nuclear-plant-31713581

The biggest questions are where the melted fuel is and in what condition. Radiation levels are too high for humans to approach. Based on computer simulations and a few remote-controlled probes, experts believe the melted fuel has breached the cores and fallen to the bottom of the containment chambers, some possibly seeping into the concrete foundation.

Majia here: These news reports are interesting because they reveal that Fukushima cannot be swept away.

Fukushima Diary is reporting strontium-90 detections of 1,000,000 Bq/m3 in TEPCO's June 2015 water samples near units 3 and 4 input valve:

http://fukushima-diary.com/2015/06/1000000-bqm3-of-sr-90-detected-in-seawater-of-fukushima-plant-port-highest-in-recorded-history/
http://www.tepco.co.jp/nu/fukushima-np/f1/smp/2015/images/2tb-east_15012701-j.pdf

Ground water samples are also rising. Fukushima Diary reported Jan 27 2015 that TEPCO detected 31,000,000 Bq/m3 of Strontium-90 measured at the nearest boring well to Reactor 2:
http://fukushima-diary.com/2015/01/31000000-bqm3-strontium-90-measured-nearest-boring-well-reactor-2/).

TEPCO's monitoring data support a situation roughly parallel to the German Melt-Through Scenario, which predicts spiking levels of Strontium-90 contaminating ground and river water after approximately 3 years (http://www.irpa.net/irpa8/cdrom/VOL.1/M1_97.PDF).

27 PBqs Cesium-137 is figure given for ocean contamination from March 2011 through mid June 2011:
Pascal Bailly Du Bois, Pierre Garreau, Philippe Laguionie, Irene Korsakissok (2014) Comparison between modelling and measurement of marine dispersion, environmental half-time and 137Cs inventories after the Fukushima Daiichi accident. Ocean Dynamics, 64(3), 361.

However the problem with this study is it relied on samples taken during a limited time period (mid-March to mid-June) primarily by TEPCO, in addition to those provided by other sources, including the Japanese Government and Ken Buesseler.

In 2014 it became clear that TEPCO was withholding water measurements after it disclosed that its method of testing for radionuclide levels was under-counting substantially beta emitters:
TEPCO withheld Fukushima radioactive water measurements for 6 months. (2014, January 9). The Asahi Shimbun.  Available http://ajw.asahi.com/article/0311disaster/fukushima/AJ201401090060
Tokyo Electric Power Co. has withheld 140 measurements of radioactive strontium levels taken in groundwater and the port of the Fukushima No. 1 nuclear plant between June and November last year. TEPCO has been releasing the combined levels of all radioactive substances, including strontium, that emit beta rays, at the crippled nuclear plant. But strontium levels exceeded the all-beta readings in some instances, leading the utility to decide they were “wrong” and to withhold them from public releases, TEPCO officials said Jan. 8. Previously, TEPCO officials said they had not released the data because the numbers were not confirmed.
How much contamination has occurred since?

How can there be no link between accelerating eco-collapse on the Pacific North American west coast and Fukushima ocean and atmospheric contamination?

Of course they have to be connected.

TEPCO and governments know that at some point fuller disclosure will be required, hence the ongoing reports about missing fuel.



OCEANS & FUKUSHIMA



 

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