Wednesday, June 4, 2014

Fukushuma Threatens Pacific: Interview


My recent interview with Voice of Russia:

Fukushima is human-engineered crisis that threatens health of Pacific Ocean - expert

Read more: http://voiceofrussia.com/2014_06_03/Fukushima-is-human-engineered-crisis-that-threatens-health-of-Pacific-Ocean-expert-7002/


4 comments:

  1. Good job. I love your interviews, yet hate the facts and implications of such.

    Shouldn't any former child of the cold war not be astonished that we don't all have Geiger-Mueller counters or better? Shall we do something about that?

    We desperately need an electronics engineer to create an inexpensive open-source low-voltage/low-current semiconductor -based detector array capable of being plugged into anybody's laptop or desktop (& something for phones/tablets). It need be something a child could construct with adult supervision. The software already exists. (see: http://www.physics.usyd.edu.au/~marek/pra/ )

    It would be a much different interview with such citizen acquired data. Would you agree?

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    Replies
    1. I do agree. We are so easily manipulated in our understandings because of its invisibility.

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  2. Title: "Photodiode Gamma Ray Detector"
    Quote: "Gamma photons interacting with cheap photodiodes produce small current pulses which are easily amplified and allow detection of individual photon events. This offers the possibility of cheap, small and rugged radiation detectors of reasonable sensitivity. While not as sensitive as larger GM-tube detectors, this solid state device is still quite useful for determining if something is radioactive enough to be interesting/concerning."
    ...
    "The circuit is simple, but as currently implemented has one major problem; poor temperature stability"
    ...
    "Spectroscopy *may* be possible with this detector, pulses do vary in amplitude, and appear to cluster around several similar amplitudes for different sources. However, the physical semiconductor sensor is quite small and no doubt only a small fraction of the energy of higher energy gammas is collected by it. It likely makes a very poor spectroscope, resolution wise, but it may be sufficient to tell apart the usual suspects, U, Th, Ra, and Am."
    ...
    "It should be possible to build large arrays with multiple buffer FETs all driving the one amplifier and comparator or pixelated detectors which operate like a gamma camera with seperate pulse detectors forming a matrix."

    quoted from: http://www.vk2zay.net/article/265

    I'm thinking of a "Mr. Radiation.com" two-sided detector that "scans" somewhat like a (pair of) regular paper scanners for thinly-sliced dried foodstuffs, etc.


    Quote of GotNoTime: "Maxim has an old app note about using PIN diodes as a radiation detector. http://www.maximintegrated.com/app-notes/index.mvp/id/2236

    It seems the BPW34 is quite a popular diode for this purpose. If you search for “BPW34 radiation detector” on Google then you get quite a few projects."

    quoted from: http://hackaday.com/2013/06/03/a-very-tiny-gamma-ray-detector/comment-page-1/#comment-1012214


    Quote: "The BPW34 comes in a plastic package which is too thick to allow alpha particles through. However, we can replace the BPW34 with a BPX61, with the glass window removed. The photodiode itself is now completely exposed and alpha particles can now be detected"

    quoted from: http://www.elektor-labs.com/project/improved-radiation-meter-110538.12082.html


    Curious: "Evidence of correlations between nuclear decay rates and Earth–Sun distance" http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S092765050900084X

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    Replies
    1. Of course, whatever solution might be presented, it likely need not be covered under patent, and preferrably open-source.

      There must be a forum or two dedicated to this very purpose. Will anyone enlighten us all, please?

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