Monday, December 12, 2011

Phoenix Radiation Increases and Why They Matter

This post is not intended to imply that levels in the US are comparable to those in Japan. Rather, the point is simply to reinforce the truth that Fukushima is a global problem capable of impacting lives many thousands of miles away. 
 
That is why we need global cooperation and transparency on Fukushima radiation. 
 
That said, now I turn to examine radiation in Phoenix and I address why relatively low-levels matter.
 
Capt. Clyde Stagner on Phoenix Radiation:
"EPA Gross Beta 2007-2010 was .0143 pCi/L^3
 
EPA Gross Beta Jan 3- Oct 2011 was O.O158 which is a 9.5% increase
 
Conversion to CPM is mathematical, but the increase will remain the same
 
This increase is either from utility [Palo Verde] or Fukushima with events occurring in Fukushima supporting the increase to the CPM -the best Clyde"
 
Majia here: And this 9.5% increase was before we had the big spikes ranging upward to 850 CPM in November and December (30 to 60 is normal). 
 
The highest reported level we had in March was 300 CPM. We had a few spikes in May but the real increases were this fall.
 
Previous Posts on Capt. Stagner's work
 
Why does this matter?

Low-Dose radiation suppresses the body’s adaptive response against genomic instability
Huang L, Kim PM, Nickoloff JA, Morgan WF. 2007. Targeted and nontargeted effects of low-dose ionizing radiation on delayed genomic instability in human cells. Cancer Research 67:1099–1104.
 
“Background” Low-Dose Ionization Radiation Can Cause Leukemia in Children
       Mark P Little1,4, Richard Wakeford2 and Gerald M KendallUpdated estimates of the proportion of childhood leukaemia incidence in Great Britain that may be caused by natural background ionising radiation Journal of Radiological Protection Volume 29 Number 4 467 

FINALLY, check out the excellent video by Goddard's Journal

I discovered the Goddard's video at Enenews http://enenews.com/report-fukushima-safety-levels-safe-video


1 comment:

  1. Radiation
    Exactly.We have to appreciate that the Japan problem is a global problem.

    ReplyDelete